Friday, May 25, 2018

Front Teeth―First In, First Out

Front Teeth―First In, First Out

Children grow up too fast. So many milestones pass: crawling, walking, talking, getting his or her first tooth. Another milestone is losing his or her first tooth. As those baby teeth fall out and their adult counterparts come in, your child graduates to the next level of dental hygiene.

So what actually happens? In simple terms, your child’s permanent teeth slowly start growing below the primary teeth. As they do, the baby teeth’s roots begin to get absorbed into the gums. As the root recedes and the permanent teeth erupt, the primary teeth are pushed out―this is the “loosening” your child will be most preoccupied with. The permanent teeth take the place of the primary teeth, essentially following the same path previously followed by their predecessors.

The first baby teeth to go (absent any unforeseen trauma or deplorable hygiene habits) are usually the lower center incisors—the two bottom teeth in the middle. Why? Simple―these teeth are the first to come in and therefore the first to go. This pattern follows for all twenty of the primary teeth—for the most part, they will leave in the order they arrived.

Although there is no set time for this to happen, the first baby tooth typically will fall out when your child is between the ages of 4 and 7. As a general rule of thumb, the earlier your child gets a first tooth, the sooner he or she will lose the first tooth. If the front center teeth haven’t started loosening by ages 6 to 7, you should come see Dr. Jared, in case the permanent teeth are blocked by extra teeth present in the jaw. Once the front center teeth go, the rest will follow in a process that should last about six years from start to finish.

Be ready for when your child’s teeth start to fall out. Communicate with your child about why his or her tooth is falling out and why it is not something to worry about. You should also explain to your child why it’s not necessary to be overly ambitious and yank out any loose teeth. Don’t hesitate to call us with any concerns.

If you have questions about loose teeth, click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.



Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Father's DAY? No way!
We'll be celebrating dads ALL WEEK on Facebook
and one lucky winner will get a Kindle Fire HD 8 just for playing along.
Look for a new way to enter to win each day
June 10th through June 16th.


Contest Rules:

By entering this promotion, participant agrees to a complete release of Facebook from any or all liability in connection with this contest. It is also acknowledgment that the contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook. No purchase is necessary to enter or win.



How to enter: Entries consist of following the directions (comment, "like," etc.) given in the official promotion posts on the KiDDS Dental Facebook page between June 10, 2018 at 9:00 AM and June 16, 2018 at 5:00 PM. One entry per promotion post per Facebook user is allowed. Multiple entries per promotion post will be disqualified.

Drawing: One random prize drawing will be held on or about June 19, 2018.  The winner will receive a Kindle Fire HD 8. This prize is valued at $89. Cash cannot be awarded in lieu of prize. Prize is not transferable. The winner is solely responsible for reporting and paying applicable state and federal taxes. If a winner is disqualified or if a prize is unclaimed, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to conduct another drawing to determine an alternate winner or to not award that winner's prize, at its sole discretion.

Odds: Actual odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries.

Eligibility: Legal residents of the United States are eligible to participate and win. Any person under the age of 18 must have a parent's or legal guardian's permission to participate and/or win.  Must be 13 years or older to enter. Employees of KiDDS Dental and their immediate families (spouse, parents, siblings, children, in-laws) are not eligible to enter. Winner must be available to pick up prize in person at KiDDS Dental in Liberty Lake, WA by June 28, 2018.

Decisions: By entering into the promotion, entrants and their parents or guardians (if the entrant is under the age of 18) agree to abide by and be bound by these official rules, and to accept the decision of KiDDS Dental as final.  Entrants and their parents or guardians (if entrant is under the age of 18) also agree to hold KiDDS Dental harmless from any liability arising from participation in this promotion. KiDDS Dental is not responsible for entries not received because of technical difficulties. KiDDS Dental reserves the right to disqualify any participant to a person who fails to follow these official rules or uses fraudulent means in participating. If for any reason this promotion is not able to be conducted as planned, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend this promotion and randomly draw from the entries received up to the cancellation/suspension date.

Liability Release: By participating, each participant and winner waives any and all claims against KiDDS Dental their employees and agents for any personal loss of any kind which may occur from the participation in the promotion.

Publicity: Each winner (and such winner's parent or guardian if any winner is under the age of 18) agrees to permit KiDDS Dental to use his/her name and likeness in promotional and other KiDDS Dental materials, without additional compensation or permission, except where prohibited by law.

This promotion is void where prohibited.

By entering the contest, entrants grant KiDDS Dental license to display, distribute, reproduce contest entries. Winners must sign a media release and will be responsible for paying any taxes they may owe on a prize.

Friday, May 11, 2018

Formula, Fluoride and Fluorosis

Formula, Fluoride and Fluorosis

Everyone agrees that the best source of nutrition for an infant is breast milk. The next best thing? Infant formula. However, despite its nutritional value, some types of infant formula have the potential to foster a condition known as dental fluorosis that involves changes in the appearance of the tooth’s surface. The tooth enamel is degraded due to an overexposure to fluoride before teeth erupt. Generally, fluorosis is not noticeable; it usually shows up as little white spots that are visible only to dental professionals. In its most severe form, fluorosis can cause brown stains on the permanent teeth.

Formula comes in three formulations: powder, liquid concentrate and ready-to-feed. Major infant formula brands have very little if any fluoride. The problem is not with the formula—it is with the water used to mix the formula. Because fluoride helps prevent tooth decay in the general population, approximately 72% of all public water systems in the United States adjust the fluoride levels in the water to obtain the optimal dose for everyone age eight and older. But that means that if you are mixing powdered or concentrated formula with tap water, you will increase the fluoride in the formula to a level that may be too high for infants. Because formula can be the primary source of an infant’s nutrition, it is easy to see how this can contribute to the onset of fluorosis.


There are two easy ways to remedy this, but they take a concentrated effort by the parent. Use ready-made formula—that’s the best option because you won’t be adding any additional fluoride to your child’s diet. However, if you do use a powdered or concentrated formula, use bottled water labeled demineralized, distilled, purified or de-ionized to reconstitute or dilute the formula. That will reduce the level of fluoride your infant is being exposed to and help secure the development of his or her esthetically pleasing smile.

Call us to schedule an appointment today! (509)-891-7070. We'd love to meet you and your family!

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Mother's DAY? No way!
We'll be celebrating mothers ALL WEEK on Facebook
and one lucky winner will get a Kindle Fire HD 8 just for playing along.
Look for a new way to enter to win each day
May 6th through May 12th.
Contest Rules:

By entering this promotion, participant agrees to a complete release of Facebook from any or all liability in connection with this contest. It is also acknowledgment that the contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook. No purchase is necessary to enter or win.



How to enter: Entries consist of following the directions (comment, "like," etc.) given in the official promotion posts on the KiDDS Dental Facebook page between May 6, 2018 at 9:00 AM and May 12, 2018 at 5:00 PM. One entry per promotion post per Facebook user is allowed. Multiple entries per promotion post will be disqualified.

Drawing: One random prize drawing will be held on or about May 14, 2018.  The winner will receive a Kindle Fire HD 8. This prize is valued at $89. Cash cannot be awarded in lieu of prize. Prize is not transferable. The winner is solely responsible for reporting and paying applicable state and federal taxes. If a winner is disqualified or if a prize is unclaimed, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to conduct another drawing to determine an alternate winner or to not award that winner's prize, at its sole discretion.

Odds: Actual odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries.

Eligibility: Legal residents of the United States are eligible to participate and win. Any person under the age of 18 must have a parent's or legal guardian's permission to participate and/or win.  Must be 13 years or older to enter. Employees of KiDDS Dental and their immediate families (spouse, parents, siblings, children, in-laws) are not eligible to enter. Winner must be available to pick up prize at KiDDS Dental in Liberty Lake, WA by May 18, 2018.

Decisions: By entering into the promotion, entrants and their parents or guardians (if the entrant is under the age of 18) agree to abide by and be bound by these official rules, and to accept the decision of KiDDS Dental as final.  Entrants and their parents or guardians (if entrant is under the age of 18) also agree to hold KiDDS Dental harmless from any liability arising from participation in this promotion. KiDDS Dental is not responsible for entries not received because of technical difficulties. KiDDS Dental reserves the right to disqualify any participant to a person who fails to follow these official rules or uses fraudulent means in participating. If for any reason this promotion is not able to be conducted as planned, KiDDS Dental reserves the right to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend this promotion and randomly draw from the entries received up to the cancellation/suspension date.

Liability Release: By participating, each participant and winner waives any and all claims against KiDDS Dental their employees and agents for any personal loss of any kind which may occur from the participation in the promotion.

Publicity: Each winner (and such winner's parent or guardian if any winner is under the age of 18) agrees to permit KiDDS Dental to use his/her name and likeness in promotional and other KiDDS Dental materials, without additional compensation or permission, except where prohibited by law.

This promotion is void where prohibited.

By entering the contest, entrants grant KiDDS Dental license to display, distribute, reproduce contest entries. Winners must sign a media release and will be responsible for paying any taxes they may owe on a prize.

Friday, April 27, 2018

Fluoride Toothpaste: Right for All Ages

Fluoride Toothpaste: Right for All Ages

Plaque, a film of bacteria that forms daily on teeth and gums, can cause gum disease and tooth decay. Brushing with toothpaste helps remove plaque. But what kind of toothpaste is best for your child?

Many toothpastes contain fluoride, a fluorine compound that also helps prevent tooth decay by inhibiting the loss of minerals from tooth enamel and encouraging remineralization of teeth. It also affects the bacteria that cause cavities by discouraging the acid attacks that break down the tooth.

But ingesting fluoride can be bad for your child. Too much fluoride may cause a condition called fluorosis. A mild case of fluorosis can cause cosmetic damage to the enamel of the child’s developing teeth, while more severe cases can cause the enamel to become pitted with brown discoloration.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry has stated that the use of fluoride is safe and highly effective. The most effective way for children to get fluoride involves frequent topical application of low doses. That means using fluoride toothpaste, even for young children.

If your child is less than two years old, start brushing your child’s teeth twice a day when the first tooth appears. Apply a tiny smear of fluoridated toothpaste to your child’s soft toothbrush. Brush all surfaces of the teeth and gums.

If your child is two to six years old, use a “pea-sized” dollop of fluoridated toothpaste. Be sure not to use too much toothpaste—studies have shown that parents often underestimate the amount of toothpaste they put on their child’s toothbrush. Follow these toothbrushing guidelines:
  • Brush your child’s teeth until the child is old enough to brush properly.
  • Once your child is old enough, closely supervise your child’s toothbrushing.
  • Limit toothbrushing to twice a day.
  • Use an appropriately sized, soft toothbrush.
  • Teach your child to spit out toothpaste rather than swallowing it.
  • Minimize or eliminate rinsing after brushing.

Fluoride toothpaste, when used properly, can help protect your child’s teeth from decay and cavities. Be sure to store toothpaste in a place that is inaccessible to your child to prevent him or her from consuming excess toothpaste.

If you have questions about fluoride toothpaste, click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.

Friday, April 13, 2018

First Aid for Your Child’s Tooth Injury

First Aid for Your Child’s Tooth Injury

Nearly half of all children suffer a tooth injury during childhood, most often from falls, traffic accidents, fighting and sports. Taking immediate action can help lead to a better outcome after treatment. Be prepared to tell us how and when the injury occurred. After Dr. Jared examines your child, he may recommend imaging, if necessary, to determine the extent of the injury and develop a treatment plan. 

Treatment varies depending on whether the injury involves a primary tooth or a permanent tooth. Loose or dislocated permanent teeth are always emergency situations. Here are some of the most common childhood tooth injuries and their treatments:
  • Dislocated or loose primary tooth: The goal of treatment for this common injury is to prevent future damage to the permanent teeth. A loose baby tooth left in place sometimes heals without treatment. If it is very loose, your dentist may remove the tooth to prevent it from falling out and becoming a choking hazard. If knocked out completely, the tooth should not be replaced into the gum. This could cause damage to the underlying permanent tooth.
  • Broken primary tooth: A dentist should examine the child as soon as possible to see if there is damage to the tooth’s nerves or blood vessels. Treatment may include smoothing the rough edges of the tooth, repairing it with resin material, leaving it in place or removing it.
  • Dislocated permanent tooth: Try to replace the dislocated tooth in its socket within 15 minutes of the injury, then call the dentist. If you are unable to replace it, place the tooth in cold milk and get to the dentist right away. The tooth usually survives if stored in milk and replaced within one hour. Teeth stored dry and reimplanted after one hour rarely survive.
  • Loose permanent tooth: Prompt dental treatment usually returns the tooth to its correct position. Sometimes, the dentist may use stitches or splints to hold the tooth in place until it heals.
  • Broken permanent tooth: These can usually be repaired successfully, especially if treated within two days of the injury. Tooth fragments can sometimes be reattached and should be stored in tap water until you get to the dentist. If the fragments cannot be found or reattached, the dentist may repair the tooth with a resin material.

Depending on the injury, your child’s dentist may prescribe pain medication or antibiotics. Eating a diet of soft foods and maintaining good oral hygiene with twice daily brushing and regular flossing assists in recovery. With your immediate first aid and prompt professional care, most childhood tooth injuries heal successfully and rarely lead to complications.

Give us a call at (509)-891-7070 to schedule today!

Friday, March 30, 2018

Fillings Don’t Have to Be Noticeable

Fillings Don’t Have to Be Noticeable

Although parents don’t want to hear that their child needs a dental filling, restorations are often necessary to treat a tooth that has experienced decay. This simple procedure restores your child’s tooth to its normal shape and function.

Today, dentists have options when it comes to selecting what material to use for fillings. While metal amalgam has been used to fill teeth for more than a century, we increasingly use tooth-colored composite resins for this procedure.

The advantages of using composite fillings include the following:
  • Composite fillings blend in well because they match the color of teeth.
  • Composite fillings bond to the teeth, helping to seal them and prevent additional decay.
  • Some composite fillings release fluoride, contributing to the prevention of decay.
  • Composite fillings can usually be placed in a hole smaller than that needed for amalgam fillings.
Composite fillings are durable. Because everyone wants healthy-looking white teeth, composite fillings are usually the material of choice for the front teeth; they can also be used on the back teeth.

One of the difficulties of placing a composite filling in a child’s mouth is that the tooth must be kept clean and dry throughout the procedure. Thus, the process takes a little longer than placing an amalgam filling, but we can keep most children still and comfortable during the procedure.


Of course, the ideal filling is no filling at all. That is why we stress the importance of proper brushing and flossing, as well as regular visits to KiDDS Dental for checkups and cleanings. If your child is due for a dental visit—or if you feel he or she needs some help or encouragement with dental hygiene—call our office for an appointment. We will work with you and your child to improve dental hygiene and reduce the chances that he or she will need any fillings—composite or amalgam—at all.

Click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jared. Or give us a call at (509)-891-7070.